I believe that a scientific discipline is only as efficient and important to society as the information available to it. If you've found these pages useful, please consider making a small donation using the Paypal buttons at the top and bottom of this page. Also, to further help offset costs of maintaining this web site, consider buying items from my online bookstore and online tree-ring supply store through

My mission was born from an overwhelming need among dendrochronologists for a permanent repository of information that was free to the public, easily understandable, and as comprehensive as humanly possible.

Come back and visit from time to time to learn more about new or updated software, new educational tools, new institutions conducting tree-ring research, new publications, and more!

We provide a few examples to demonstrate the broad range of work and research we undertake, give a summary of results, and provide a bibliography of published books, academic papers, and general articles.

With fall coming to a close, there is no better time to talk about tree rings and their use in archaeology.

We undertake both private and commercial commissions in dendrochronology throughout the UK: Most previous reports are available for purchase and these are listed on the Building page.

The Tree-Ring Services web-site provides further information on our services and dendrochronology and dendroclimatology research. Some of our more recent reports are listed below: Buildings we date by dendrochronology are generally also published in Vernacular Architecture and summaries of the typographic features are available from the Building Archaeological Research Database (BARD).

You probably know that trees have rings, which you can see and count when you look at a stump after a tree has been cut, but did you know that the rings of a tree let you know how old it is?

Tree ring dating allows archaeologists to date when a tree was cut. Douglass was an astronomer that worked at archaeological sites in the Southwestern United States. Soon, with the rise of computers and statistical methods, scientists, like archaeologists, were able to create long series of tree ring dates that could be used to help figure out how old things are Dendrochronology, or tree ring dating, examines the rings produced by trees each year.

The size of the rings can also depend on the age of the tree, because as a tree gets older it produces narrower rings as well. Dendrochronology has two uses in archaeology: it can be used to calibrate (correct) radiocardon dates, and it can be used to date things all on its own.

Archaeologists look at other trees of the same species in the area because they have the same ring patterns.

Dendrochronology or tree-ring dating is the scientific method of dating using the annual nature of tree growth in suitable tree species.