Search for: If you visit a sexual health service for the first time, you are usually asked to fill in a form with your name and contact details.Unless you are seeing your GP, you don't have to give your real name or tell staff who your GP is if you don't want to.Chlamydia is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in the UK.

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The registry, including the Public Notification Database, is based on the Virginia General Assembly's decision to facilitate access to publicly-available information about persons convicted of specified violent and sexual offenses.

The Virginia State Police has not considered or assessed the specific risk of re-offense with regard to any individual prior to his or her inclusion within this registry, and has made no determination that any individual included in the registry is currently dangerous.

Almost 7 in every 10 people diagnosed with the condition were under 25 years old.

Most people with chlamydia don't notice any symptoms and don't know they have it. The bacteria are usually spread through sex or contact with infected genital fluids (semen or vaginal fluid).

They involve sending a sample of cells to a laboratory for analysis.

You don't necessarily have to be examined by a doctor or nurse first and can often collect the sample yourself.Although chlamydia doesn't usually cause any symptoms and can normally be treated with a short course of antibiotics, it can be serious if it's not treated early on.If left untreated, the infection can spread to other parts of your body and lead to long-term health problems, such as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), epididymo-orchitis (inflammation of the testicles), and infertility. This is why it's important to get tested and treated as soon as possible if you think you might have chlamydia. Testing for chlamydia is done with a urine test or a swab test.If you do develop symptoms, you may experience: If you think you're at risk of having an STI or have any symptoms of chlamydia, visit your GP, community contraceptive service or local genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinic to get tested. You can get chlamydia through: It can also be passed by a pregnant woman to her baby – read about the complications of chlamydia for more information about this.Chlamydia can't be passed on through casual contact, such as kissing and hugging, or from sharing baths, towels, swimming pools, toilet seats or cutlery.Simply select the services you want and carry out a postcode search.