On Windows 7, that setting is in the Start menu, a place users expect it to be. (In fairness, Microsoft added a power icon to the Start screen in Windows 8.1.) Now that the Start menu's back on Windows 10, the shutdown setting is right back where it belongs and as easy to access as in Windows 7.

7 up dating-20

It's such a cliché, but if it ain't broke, don't fix it.

Or in this case, if Windows 7 still works perfectly fine, why update it to Windows 10?

So for comparison’s sake, I pulled out an old Windows 7-based Ultrabook—a five-year-old ASUS Zenbook UX31E—and set about to clean install and then fully update the OS the old-fashioned way, using only Windows Update. After the initial install was over, there were a number of missing drivers, including any form of networking.

So I installed the Intel chipset drivers and then those for networking (I had previously copied them to a USB stick), rebooted, and got connected to my wireless network. After an initial update to the Windows Update software, I then proceeded to stare at a “Checking for updates…” window that was clearly doing absolutely nothing. But doubly disappointing since this issue exacerbates the central problem with fully updating Windows 7 today: You have several hundred updates to get through as it is, and having to wait to install them is untenable. One hour later—two hours since the clean install completed—Windows Update had installed 106 of the 226 important updates.

Like how Windows 10 corrects most of the misguided design decisions of Windows 8, Windows 7 was the OS that cleaned up the mess that was Windows Vista. You can count me in the boat of users who hated Windows 8.

If you grew up on Windows, chances are you've developed habits. "I couldn't even figure out how to restart and shutdown [a Windows 8 PC]" says Sammie Lin, a graphic designer who switched from PC to Mac, and hasn't looked back.Not anymore: Microsoft now offers a “Windows 7 SP1 Convenience Rollup” that essentially functions as Windows 7 Service Pack 2.With a single download, you can install the hundreds of updates at once. This update package, which combines updates dating all the way back to February 2011, isn’t being made available in Windows Update.If your PC is still running Windows 7, you may be wondering if you should pull the trigger and install Windows 10.After all, it's a free upgrade until a year from now.It's the first major patch since Service Pack 1, launched in February, 2011, so it covers hundreds of security, stability and usability fixes.